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Saturday, October 21, 2000



Meteor Shower

(NASA) - Earlier this month our Earth's orbit carried our planet into a diffuse stream of dusty debris from Halley's comet. Until now we've been in the rarefied outskirts of the debris field, but we're heading for denser parts. Tiny bits of Halley dust that burn up in our planet's atmosphere will produce a meteor shower, called the Orionids, that peaks this weekend, October 21st and 22nd. Orionid meteors won't be nearly as bright as a decaying Proton rocket shell, but the display should be nonetheless pleasing.

No matter where you live, the best time to see Orionid meteors will be during the hours from tonight through the 23rd. Rural observers should enjoy as many as 20 shooting stars per hour. During this year's broad peak, centered tonight, the light of the waning quarter Moon will make faint meteors hard to spot; pre-dawn observers tomorrow and on the 23rd may have better luck with diminishing moonlight.


- posted by Alex @ 11:29 EST