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Tuesday, June 28, 2005



Nanotubes for Better Hydrogen Storage

Titanium atoms (dark blue) attached to a carbon nanotube (light blue) bonded to H2 (red) molecules.
Titanium atoms (dark blue) attached to a carbon nanotube (light blue) bonded to H2 (red) molecules.
Credit: T. Yildirim/NIST
Carbon nanotubes with Titanium atoms bonded to it have been shown to hold 8% of its weight in Hydrogen. Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology came across this phenomenon while running new models and computations for the electronic structure of materials. The FreedomCAR Research Partnership, which involves the Department of Energy with Ford Motor Company, DaimlerChrysler, and General Motors, stated a minimum storage capacity of 6% Hydrogen by weight. Until these results, that goal has been elusive. The Hydrogen can be released by simply heating the complex. Storing Hydrogen in a tank is extremely dangerous, and alternative methods would help spread the acceptance of this technology and increase safety on space missions. Safer and better storage of Hydrogen would also allow for a higher mass ratio for space exploration. This translates into less cost for lifting the same amount of fuel. The findings could also be used to find more efficient catalysts.

(More info: NIST)


- posted by Jim @ 9:27 EST