Become a Member


News Archive



2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015 | 2016 | 2017
January | February | March | April | May | June | July | August | September | October | November | December


Sunday, February 3, 2002


New Submit Article Feature

Red Colony.com is about knowledge. Currently that knowledge and ideas come from three sources, Brian Rudo, Jim Keener, and myself. While we feel that our articles are well-researched and thought out, it has always been a goal of mine to hear what others think. So few people know anything about terraforming, colonization, etc, but the internet offers those people a chance to congregate. It is for this reason that we now offer you the chance to submit your own articles. Click on the Submit Article link above to send us your ideas. We can't guarantee that your article will be approved, but so long as it is informative and backed with facts, we'll publish it on the site. You've sent us your ideas for the past 2 years, but we've never offered the opportunity for you to have them published directly. RC has a user base of tens of thousands of unique visitors all around the world and is a respected leader in Mars colonization news. Let Red Colony.com tap that great reservoir of knowledge.

- posted by Alex @ 15:00 EST

(permanent link)

Tuesday, February 5, 2002


Poll Results

(MSNBC) - A public survey conducted for NASA shows overwhelming support for Mars missions. Of the more than 54,000 people who responded to the online survey run by the Planetary Society, more than 90 percent ranked Mars exploration among the top five missions priorities. Missions to the moon and Jupiter’s moon Europa were the next most popular, were both ranked in the top five by more than 60 percent of respondents. The next closest contender for favorite destination was Pluto, along with its neighboring objects, at 37 percent. Survey participants were also asked to rank 10 possibilities regarding the purpose of solar system exploration. Understanding the origins of the solar system ranked high overall, but was the top choice for only 9 percent of participants. Searching for any potential danger to Earth from space and determine the suitability of other planets for human colonization tied for the most No. 1 votes, with 25 percent each, but were ranked low by many respondents.

(More info: MSNBC.com)


- posted by Alex @ 19:02 EST

(permanent link)


Nuclear Power Next for NASA?

Nuclear Power.
Nuclear Power.
Credit: Space Nuclear Power and Propulsion Tutorial
(MSNBC) NASA has proposed spending almost a billion dollars over the next five years to develop atomic-powered rockets that could speed spacecraft across the heavens and nuclear reactors to energize outposts on distant planets. In President Bush's 2003 federal budget, released Monday, the space agency proposes to spend about $46.5 million to begin developing nuclear electric rockets and $79 million more to build atomic-powered generators that can fly on spacecraft. Such atomic-driven energy systems, said Ed Weiler, NASA’s associate administrator for science, would eventually free NASA from a dependence on chemical rockets, which are relatively slow and clunky, in the agency’s exploration of distant worlds, such as Jupiter’s moons or the planet Pluto. Right now, NASA spacecraft are launched by a burst of chemical rockets that burn for a few minutes to break away from Earth’s gravity. After that, said Weiler, the spacecraft must drift across deep space toward their target or whip around nearby planets to gain speed, voyages that can take years. The spacecraft, in most cases, are powered by solar cells that convert sunlight to electricity. For distant planets, the sunlight often is so dim that there is little electricity for instruments. He envisions rockets that use nuclear fission or fusion that could fire for months, driving the spacecraft to higher and higher speeds, and then slowing the spacecraft when it approaches its target. Such a technique could possibly halve the time of a 17-year voyage to Pluto, the only solar system planet not yet visited.

(More info: MSNBC.com)


- posted by Alex @ 23:03 EST

(permanent link)

Friday, February 8, 2002


Odyssey's Antenna

(CNN) - The Mars Odyssey spacecraft successfully extended the main communications antenna it will use to send science data to Earth, NASA officials said. Engineers received confirmation earlier this week that the boom holding the 4.3-foot wide dish had deployed. The spacecraft will use the parabolic antenna to transmit the scientific data it gathers, including images, back to Earth at 110,000 bits per second. In later years, the satellite will use the antenna to relay to Earth data gathered by other probes both in orbit around Mars and operating on its surface. Odyssey, which started its $297 million journey on April 7, will map the mineral and chemical makeup of the surface of Mars and hunt for large deposits of water when its science work begins later this month.

(More info: CNN.com)


- posted by Alex @ 16:04 EST

(permanent link)


Mars in Utah

Mars in Utah.
Mars in Utah.
Credit: Mars Society
(MSNBC - Robert Zubrin) - After months of delays, the Mars Desert Research Station finally went operational today. A lot of things are still balky, the satellite communication system is behaving erratically, much of the internal network doesn’t work, and there is a problem with one of the water pumps. But we have a completed and fully provisioned station, a fairly well-equipped lab, a good power system, five functioning spacesuit simulators, three good all-terrain vehicles, sufficient satellite and local UHF com capabilities to function, and a highly qualified crew who is willing to do what it takes to push through. So today we began. The MDRS is the second Mars analog research station built and operated by the Mars Society in remote areas. The first was the Flashline Mars Arctic Research Station, which started work on Canada’s Devon Island last summer. This one is located in the desert west of Hanksville, Utah, amid several hundred square miles of unvegetated, uninhabited land. The landscape is composed largely of red Jurassic sedimentary rocks that look as much like Mars as one could desire, and whose varied geology provides an excellent target for Mars exploration operations research. For the next three months our station will operate here with varied crews in a series of two-week rotations. What we will attempt to do is conduct a sustained program of field research into the geology, paleontology and microbiology of the area while working in the same style and under many of the same constraints that will face humans when they explore Mars.

(More info: MSNBC.com)


- posted by Alex @ 23:06 EST

(permanent link)

Saturday, February 9, 2002


New Image: New Mars

New Mars.
New Mars.
Credit: Andrew C. Stewart
Andrew C Stewart sent us an original image entitled "New Mars".

I am a big fan of Astronomy and the future of Mars, I have just been on your website and find it very interesting. I am also a artist with a passion to paint visions of the human future in space. I have sent a image of the planet Mars in the course of terraforming as seen from its moon phobos.


- posted by Alex @ 15:07 EST

(permanent link)

Thursday, February 14, 2002


Valentine from Mars

Happy Valentine's Day!
Happy Valentine's Day!
Credit: NASA
Special images from Mars taken by the Mars Global Surveyor reveal heartwarming formations on the surface. Happy Valentine's Day from the RC team!

(More info: CNN.com)


- posted by Brian @ 17:13 EST

(permanent link)

Tuesday, February 19, 2002


Odyssey Begins its Mission

Mars Odyssey.
Mars Odyssey.
Credit: NASA
The Odyssey probe has begun its 917-day mission this week. One of the top priorities is the search for water. Whether water is still exists on the planet or if it has evaporated into space remains a question. Scientists hope Odyssey, and its ability to sniff out the hydrogen bound to oxygen that forms water, will answer that question. Odyssey will also search for table salt, the deposit of liquid water.

From about 250 miles, the thermal emission imaging system and a combination gamma ray spectrometer and neutron detector will map out the distribution of chemicals in the top three feet or so of the Martian soil. A third instrument, designed to monitor radiation, has malfunctioned.

(More info: CNN.com)


- posted by Jim @ 16:14 EST

(permanent link)

Monday, February 25, 2002


Mars Compositions

Thanks to some extensive research done by Jim Keener, the Mars Compositions chart has been completed. In it you will find chemical compositions of the atmosphere and soil of Mars. Useful for article writing and research, the feature is a great quick reference chart. With the coming data of Mars Odyssey this spring, more compositions will be available.

- posted by Alex @ 16:17 EST

(permanent link)

Thursday, February 28, 2002


Life on Europa?

(CNN) - A planetary scientist says a combination of physical conditions on one of the moons of Jupiter might not only make life possible but also encourage it to evolve. Europa, an icy world that appears to be pocked with strange streaks of color, is continuously contorted by the powerful pull of its parent planet, the largest in our solar system. Richard Greenberg of the University of Arizona says those tidal forces could warm a subsurface ocean and push liquid pockets to the surface on occasion, helping nudge any primitive life forms to evolve. "The implication is that these settings would actually be hospitable to life," says Greenberg, who works on the NASA imaging team for the Galileo probe. It has orbited Jupiter since 1997. Galileo's photos and scientific measurements have provided strong evidence that Europa possesses the largest known salty ocean in our solar system underneath its frozen exterior. Besides water, ideal conditions for known life would include heat. And the gravitational tides put into motion by Jupiter might do the trick. Tidal forces periodically stretch the icy surface as high as 500 meters (more than 1,600 feet) above normal sea level. "Everything on and under the surface is driven by the tides," Greenberg says in a statement. In theory, the friction from this tidal pull could generate enough heat to melt the ice on the surface. And close-up photos of the surface indicate that exterior cracks frequently thaw and refreeze. "The ocean is interacting with the surface. There is a possible biosphere that extends from way below the surface to just above the crust," Greenberg said.

(More info: CNN.com)


- posted by Alex @ 19:18 EST

(permanent link)


A Recent Mars Flood

Recent Mars flood.
Recent Mars flood.
Credit: NASA
(CNN) - In the 1970s, satellite pictures from the Viking spacecraft convinced many scientists that colossal water floods carved great gullies on Mars 2 billion years ago. But now, new evidence says that more water than that contained in Lake Erie likely gushed over the surface about 10 million years ago, said planetary geologists investigating photographs from Mars Global Surveyor. The photograph was made with data from a laser topographic instrument on the satellite. "Athabasca Valles is an almost new component in the martian hydrological cycle," said Devon Burr, a doctoral student in geosciences at the University of Arizona in Tucson. "The water here gushed from volcano-tectonic fissures. While the fissures themselves may be older, the latest eruption of the water was probably only about 10 million years ago."

(More info: CNN.com)


- posted by Jim @ 20:19 EST

(permanent link)

2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015 | 2016 | 2017
January | February | March | April | May | June | July | August | September | October | November | December