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Saturday, August 5, 2000


Add Your Site

Calling all Mars sites! We're looking for sites to be added to the Red Colony.com directory. Send an email to webmaster@redcolony.com with the following information:

     Site name:
     Site type (terraforming, exploration, etc.):
     Site URL:
     Webmaster's email (optional):

Please include any comments on how we may improve Red Colony.com to benefit the entire Martian community.


- posted by Alex @ 16:56 EST

(permanent link)

Sunday, August 6, 2000


Carbon Dioxide may have carved colossal canyons

Valles Marinaris
Valles Marinaris
Credit: NASA
Against the common belief, geologist and report author Nick Hoffman announced his theory that carbon dioxide carved the many canyons on Mars and not water. The more commonly accepted view says that liquid water once erupted from deep underground aquifers to carve the many canyons on Mars. Hoffman's theory is in dispute, since coastlines and pooling evidence can be found downstream from such canyons as the great Vallis Marinaris, shown below. Red Colony.com and other terraforming resources still hold to the theory that water, has, and still can be found on Mars.

(More info: CNN.com)


- posted by Alex @ 13:00 EST

(permanent link)

Friday, August 11, 2000


Not just one, two rovers to explore Mars in 2003

NASA has announced it has plans to send two rovers to Mars in the 2003-2004 mission. The $600 Million program will include a landing on flat terrain and one in a less stable area to do extensive testing and experimentation. Each rover will be able to travel about 100 yards a day, which is the total lifetime distance traveled by the 1997 Sojourner rover. NASA expects the rovers to last 90 days before dust blocks their solar panels. The twin rovers will be the fourth and fifth to land on Mars in history.

(More info: CNN.com)


- posted by Alex @ 19:04 EST

(permanent link)

Tuesday, August 15, 2000


Red Colony.com's exclusive interview with Steve Squyres

Red Colony.com Webmaster Alex Moore recently sent and email to Steve Squyres, chairman of NASA's Space Science Advisory Committee, and he wrote back. The following transcript is a portion of that letter.

... what precautions are you taking to make sure that the same mistakes that took place in previous missions will not occur once again?

Plenty. The most obvious one is that this mission is adequately funded, with healthy cost reserves to help us deal with the problems that will occur. We've also got a much more rigorous review process planned than has been the case for some recent missions. Perhaps most importantly, we've got a lot of really major heritage... the Pathfinder entry/descent/landing system being the most significant example. We'll be the first mission ever launched to Mars with a landing system that has been demonstrated previously to work.

To read the entire interview, click here.


- posted by Alex @ 18:07 EST

(permanent link)

Wednesday, August 23, 2000


Recent Site Happenings

Red Colony.com celebrates its one month anniversary with some major changes. First off, the Mission Section is complete, filled with five informative articles by two talented writers. These articles will serve as a reliable source for the scientific community.

Secondly, the file archive is up and running, including any and all documents, emails, and audio/video files of use. You may search the file archive as well as the news archive from their respective pages, or using the search at right.

Last, we would like to apologize for the lack of a chat room. Due to circumstances beyond our control, the inclusion of a chat room to Red Colony.com has been delayed. The deadline for the Mars Chat is set for this Friday the 25th.

Thank you to everyone for your patience. If you have any comments, suggestions, or just want to say hi, feel free to contact us at the Contact Page.


- posted by Alex @ 15:09 EST

(permanent link)

Friday, August 25, 2000


Mars Chat Introduction

As previously announced, Red Colony.com now features a Mars Chat, available to the public tonight at 6:00 PM EST. We are holding an introductory chat, where you will have a chance to meet webmaster Alex Moore. We will begin by discussing the future of the site, as well as any future chat events. Please join us, as your comments and suggestions will certainly be discussed.

Hope to see you there,
Alex Moore


- posted by Alex @ 13:11 EST

(permanent link)

Saturday, August 26, 2000


Saltwater ocean discovered on Europa

Europa
Europa
Credit: NASA
A saltwater ocean, at least 4.5 miles deep, was discovered beneath the surface of the jovian moon, Europa by NASA's Galileo probe recently. The discovery was made after the probe sent back readings of a fluctuating magnetosphere. The magnetic pattern is associated with tidal flexing caused by the powerful pull of Jupiter. "The evidence that Europa's field varies temporarily, strengthens the argument that a liquid ocean exists beneath the present-day surface," said Margaret Kivelson of the University of California, who wrote the report published in Science. What does this mean for the Mars terraforming effort?

(More info: CNN.com)


- posted by Alex @ 19:13 EST

(permanent link)

Monday, August 28, 2000


Biologically Engineered Insects

Insects
Insects
Credit: Maxis
Developing an ecosystem on Mars will perhaps be our greatest challenge. It goes without saying that plants must slowly be introduced to Mars, and over the decades they will increase in size and complexity. But what many don't realize is the need for simple insects. Without them, plant life, and therefore all life, could not exist. In this exclusive article, we explore the future of bioengineering, and discover what steps will be taken to getting there.

- posted by Alex @ 11:15 EST

(permanent link)

Thursday, August 31, 2000


Martian Ecosystem

Ecosystem
Ecosystem
Credit: Unknown
The ecosystem of Earth as we understand it today consists of billions of species, all interacting with each other in ways that we sometimes do not understand. As soon as one species is removed, all the organisms interacting with it are affected, and thus like a giant circle of dominoes all of the species in the entire ecosystem are affected, usually adversely. Usually old species or new ones take the place of the eliminated species, and the ecosystem survives. But can we take this risk on Mars?

- posted by Alex @ 13:19 EST

(permanent link)

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