Become a Member


News Archive



2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015 | 2016 | 2017
January | February | March | April | May | June | July | August | September | October | November | December


Thursday, August 1, 2002


Closer Faster

(MSNBC) - While NASA wrestles with out-of-control costs and program management woes embedded within the international space station project, behind-the-scenes efforts are under way to shape long-range space goals. One such endeavor involves NASA, industry and Russian space engineers hammering out a humans-to-Mars mission, backed by funding from the U.S. State Department. One avenue for putting human space exploration back on track is work through the International Science and Technology Center - an intergovernmental organization dedicated to the nonproliferation of weapons technology of mass destruction. NASA is a full-fledged and leading participant. The European Space Agency, as well as the French space agency, are also active players in the centerís studies. Work has already wrapped up on Project 1172, a two-year-long study that detailed a viable strategy of placing a human crew on Mars for a tour of duty stretching out for a little over a month. "Iím not sure how much closer we are to Mars, but certainly by providing a platform that allows these groups to work together it may bring us at least a little bit closer... or at least closer faster," said Anne Harrington, acting director of the Office of Proliferation Threat Reduction at the State Department.

(More info: MSNBC.com)


- posted by Alex @ 19:13 EST

(permanent link)

Saturday, August 3, 2002


Deadly Asteroid Determined Harmless

2002 NT7
2002 NT7
Credit: NASA
NASA's Near Earth Object (NEO) Program, established to locate and study asteroids and comets that may potentially strike the Earth, let out a sigh of relief. As with most NASA branches, NEO is poorly funded. The agency can only track a small portion of the sky. A previously unknown object, 2002 NT7, was feared to hit the Earth in 2019 and was the most threatening object to date. Astronomers estimated the object to be 2 kilometers wide... enough to wipe out Europe. However, on August 1st, the asteroid was removed from the agency's "Current Impact Risks" list.

(More info: NASA.gov)


- posted by Alex @ 11:14 EST

(permanent link)

Sunday, August 4, 2002


New Poll Feature Released

I've added a poll to Red Colony.com. The topic: When will humans set foot on Mars?

- posted by Alex @ 17:16 EST

(permanent link)

Sunday, August 11, 2002


Beagle 2 Construction Started

Beagle 2.
Beagle 2.
Credit: ESA
(CNN) - Taking a leap forward in the study of Mars, European engineers began construction on the Beagle 2, a lander slated to hit the red planet in 2003. The robot craft will probe rocks, dig into the soil and sniff the air, checking for organic matter and other life-related chemical compounds like atmospheric methane. The Beagle 2, named after Charles Darwin's sea ship HMS Beagle, will hitch a ride with the Mars Express, a European Space Agency craft that will orbit the red planet. "We hope that when it arrives on Mars at the end of next year, we will finally be able to answer the eternal question: Is there, or was there, life on Mars." said Colin Pillinger, a British scientist involved in the Beagle 2 mission: "The assembly room will keep Beagle 2 free of terrestrial microorganisms and other forms of contamination," Pillinger, an Open University professor, said. "We don't want to contaminate the planets we go to," said John Bennett, a team scientist with ESA's Mars Express project. A handful of planet researchers speculate that it could have already happened, since numerous Russian and U.S. landers have touched down on Mars since the 1970s.

(More info: CNN.com)


- posted by Alex @ 16:16 EST

(permanent link)

Saturday, August 17, 2002


New Article: Mission Trajectory

Clement Walsh has submitted a new article to Red Colony. His article describes the different types of trajectory paths available to reach Mars.

- posted by Alex @ 11:23 EST

(permanent link)

Wednesday, August 21, 2002


New "Old" Format

Red Colony.com has reverted to the classic format. News updates on the front page will be in a larger font with more destinguishable dividers between updates.

- posted by Alex @ 12:23 EST

(permanent link)


New Article: Who Should Govern Mars?

Clement Walsh has submitted another article. Who Should Govern Mars?, a well thought-out article describing different stances on governing Mars, has been posted in the User Submitted Article section. Obviously a lot of time was spent on this article, and Clement deserves a round of applause.

- posted by Alex @ 15:21 EST

(permanent link)

Saturday, August 24, 2002


Space Elevator Soon a Reality? ... Yes

Arthur C. Clarke
Arthur C. Clarke
Credit: Unknown
(National Post) - The fantastic notion of a space elevator -- a concept that first appeared in a Russian technical journal in the early 1960s and then crept into the works of science fiction author Arthur C. Clarke in the 1970s -- could be a reality before long. Seattle-based HighLift Systems is hosting a conference this week to meet with investors and other parties potentially interested in a device that could open the final frontier to the masses within 15 years because of the space elevator's relatively low costs and extremely high traffic volume. NASA has given HighLift a US$570,000 grant to continue research into the elevator and the company has received an indication of support from the European Space Agency, which has representatives attending the Seattle conference. "With a system as inexpensive as ours, every nation could have a space program. Most universities could have a space program. And a few corporations could have their own space program," said Michael Laine, the company's president. Unlike the science fiction version, this space elevator need not be anchored improbably both to Earth and an asteroid. Instead, it would be tethered just to Earth from a floating platform in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. From there, a 100,000-kilometre-long ribbon about one metre wide with the thickness of a sheet of paper would be propelled by rockets beyond the point in space where orbiting objects remain above a fixed point on the Earth's surface, the so-called geosynchronous orbit. The elevator would be kept in place by the competing forces of gravity at the lower end of the shaft, and, at the far end, outward acceleration.

- posted by Alex @ 10:34 EST

(permanent link)

Tuesday, August 27, 2002


Methanogens

Methanogens.
Methanogens.
Credit: Unknown
(CNN.com) - New research has confirmed that the bacteria known as methanogens are capable of surviving in simulated Martian conditions. This bodes extremely well for terraforming, as these most basic of organisms get their name from producing methane, a greenhouse gas. The researchers noted that all Mars would need would be water and hydrogen, which other research suggests is present in low to high quantity on the surface and underground. While simple methanogens may not be the best route to terraforming, modified versions of these organisms are among the top contenders for the best method to terraform the red planet.

In addition, the new research increases the possibility that life may still be present on Mars from its theorized earlier, Earth-like days. After all, since evidence suggests that Mars may have been Earth-like in the past, and thus contained life, it seems reasonable that the organisms that filled the niches that methanogens on Earth fill today on Mars survived to the present. As always, further research will be required on all fronts.

- posted by Brian @ 15:43 EST

(permanent link)


2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015 | 2016 | 2017
January | February | March | April | May | June | July | August | September | October | November | December