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Friday, September 1, 2000


Steve Squyers featured on MSNBC

Carl Sagan was right when he picked Steve Squyers to work on the Voyager mission when he was only 22. The Mars rover director was recently interviewed by MSNBC, a world leader in Mars News. To read this interview click here. Red Colony.com featured an exclusive interview with him on August 15. The Cornell University astronomer visited Red Colony.com himself several times.

- posted by Alex @ 11:26 EST

(permanent link)


Mars News - Biweekly Newsletter

Opening September with a bang, Red Colony.com introduced the Mars News biweekly newsletter today. You can subscribe here or at right. You will recieve the latest happenings on Red Colony.com, including a look into future events. Also, each newsletter will present a topic of colonization, writen by webmaster Alex Moore.

- posted by Alex @ 16:26 EST

(permanent link)

Sunday, September 3, 2000


Red Colony.com ranked 868th at Internet.com

We've been ranked 868th by internet.com, a service that ranks web sites from around the world. We are listed in the Science and Technology category, against sites featuring computer, Internet, and educational services. Our listing has grown tremendously within only a few weeks, and still continues to grow. This is a high honor to even be listed on internet.com. Be sure to periodically check our listing on the right, as it will continue to grow.

- posted by Alex @ 13:39 EST

(permanent link)

Monday, September 4, 2000


Red Colony.com listed in Yahoo!

Happy Labor Day everyone. Today is a big day for Red Colony.com. Today Yahoo! added us to their directory. Although we are not in the searchable databse as of now, we will be in 1-3 days. For now, you can go to the What's New directory at Yahoo! to see our link in the Science section. Traffic volume has quadrupled in 6 hours and is continuing to rise. Be sure to look for us in the Astronomy > Solar System > Planets > Mars > Colonization section by the end of the week. For you folks in the UK, use this link.

- posted by Alex @ 9:50 EST

(permanent link)


Terran Vegetation

Earth and Mars Beach
Earth and Mars Beach
Credit: Unknown
All future life on Mars will come from Earth. This is an obstacle that can never be overcome. Of course organisms will be altered to be able to withstand conditions on Mars, but they will always be of Terran descent. Which organisms we chose as the base of new Martian life will determine how the planet is terraformed in the future. Red Colony.com takes a look at the future of vegetation on Mars in this exclusive article.

- posted by Alex @ 15:48 EST

(permanent link)

Tuesday, September 5, 2000


Biologically Engineered Animals

Martian monkey?
Martian monkey?
Credit: Naturalight
Earth's biosphere contains a food chain so complicated and diverse that it is unexplained in science. Modern biologists rely on two very old theories, one being that each link in the food chain is reliant upon the link before it, and that each link is reliant upon the one after it. Discover what precautions we will take on Mars to be sure to create a successful biosphere.

- posted by Alex @ 21:22 EST

(permanent link)

Thursday, September 7, 2000


Downloads Section Grand Opening

Fulfilling our commitment to bringing you the latest Mars news in the coolest format we present the Downloads Section, filled with cool downloads. You'll find anything from music to wallpaper, the Red Colony.com CD (coming soon) and more! This is just one of the new exciting features planned ahead. Stay tuned!

- posted by Alex @ 18:25 EST

(permanent link)

Friday, September 8, 2000


West Virginia University

West Virginia University recently set up a link to Red Colony.com on their Department of Physics front page. To view the website, click here. The link reads, "articles on Mars terraforming, exploration, and colonization." Alternatively, you may view a screenshot of the page. This proves that Red Colony.com really is a great resource for college students and professors alike.

- posted by Alex @ 15:29 EST

(permanent link)

Saturday, September 9, 2000


Six Pack to Go

Six Pack to Go
Six Pack to Go
Credit: Six Pack to Go
Red Colony.com was listed as part of Web-Star's Six Pack to Go website, a service that picks six new websites daily to be added to their directory. To visit the website click here, or view a screenshot.

- posted by Alex @ 15:37 EST

(permanent link)


Mars News - Issue 1.1

The first issue of Mars News was published today. If you weren't on the mailing list, don't worry. You can still read the issue at the newsletter archive. Mars News is a biweekly newsletter, published every other sunday. To subscribe to the official newsletter of the Red Planet, click here or at right. Mars News, The future of Mars today.

- posted by Alex @ 21:52 EST

(permanent link)

Sunday, September 10, 2000


Red Colony.com en Espaņol

Red Colony.com went international today with the addition of Spanish, French, German, Italian, and Portuguese translations. Sponsored by Go.com, international visitors now have the opportunity to view the entire website in their respective languages. (This is also the first time any Mars website has been featured in six languages.) Each translation covers the entire website, and is updated automatically. To view Red Colony.com in other languages, click on the flags above, or here.

- posted by Alex @ 20:59 EST

(permanent link)

Monday, September 11, 2000


Rating of "The Best" from Go.com

As part of an incredible 60 search engine surge, including Go.com, Alta Vista, Google, and others, Go.com has rated Red Colony.com with an incredible "The Best" rating. This puts the website at the top of the Space Colonization category. To view a screenshot click here. Along with the rating, Red Colony.com was recognized for its chat and video capabilities, the only in its class.

- posted by Alex @ 21:29 EST

(permanent link)

Wednesday, September 13, 2000


Mars 300-Year Weather Forecast

Weather on Mars.
Weather on Mars.
Credit: Unknown
Weather affects our lives every single day. Many of us take for granted that the Earth's vast weather system controls us in so many ways. The Red Planet's atmosphere is too thin to hold moisture, and the air is too cold to have liquid water. Thus, Mars is a cold, dead, and barren planet that has not seen change for millions of years. Our job is to learn Earth's vast weather patterns and implement them on Mars. By studying weather and learning from it, we will better understand the future of weather on Mars.

- posted by Alex @ 20:51 EST

(permanent link)

Friday, September 15, 2000


Mars Fact Sheet

Red Colony.com presents an exciting new feature, the Mars Fact Sheet. As part of our commitment to bringing you the latest colonization and terraforming news, we must also remember the very reason this page exists. The Mars Fact Sheet, found here also provides a quick reference for Mars information, and will soon include a large navigable gallery of images and captions.

- posted by Brian @ 15:47 EST

(permanent link)

Saturday, September 16, 2000


Server Down

Today our server was down and inactive. We apologize greatly for this inconvenience, and for any trouble this may have caused you. Please feel free to contact us here. The server should be up and running now and will remain active.

Thanks,
Alex Moore


- posted by Alex @ 22:58 EST

(permanent link)

Sunday, September 17, 2000


Fact Sheets with Definitions, FAQ, and Help

The new Fact Sheets have been updated to include definitions on various words, landforms, and an FAQ and Help section. To access these sections, click on Fact Sheets at left, or look for words in orange throughout every article. Please be aware that not all sections are working, but that we will continue updating until they are completed.

- posted by Alex @ 19:42 EST

(permanent link)

Monday, September 18, 2000


Red Colony.com Ranked 232nd at Internet.com

We've been ranked 232nd by internet.com, a service that ranks web sites from around the world. We are listed in the Science and Technology category, among sites featuring computer, internet, and other educational services. Previously we were ranked 868th, and have grown tremendously since.

- posted by Alex @ 16:14 EST

(permanent link)


Webmasters Recognized for National Award

Red Colony.com webmaster Alex Moore and Brandon Traynor were awarded tonight for a website competition that they took place in this summer. The two students took part in the national TSA competition in Atlanta, Georgia. After winning second place for website design, they were awarded tonight for their efforts.

- posted by Alex @ 18:27 EST

(permanent link)

Tuesday, September 19, 2000


Mars FAQ Released with 2003-04 Rovers

The Mars FAQ was released today, filled with the most frequently asked questions on the Mars Pathfinder, Global Surveyor, and the mysterious 2003-04 rovers. In the easy-interface Fact Sheets format, the Mars FAQ will become the hub of mission news, past, present and future. Also, don't forget to sign up for Mars News, the biweekly newsletter of Mars happenings. Click here for more information.

- posted by Alex @ 20:46 EST

(permanent link)

Wednesday, September 20, 2000


Introducing Current Missions Section

Mars rover.
Mars rover.
Credit: NASA
Red Colony.com is proud to introduce a whole new section devoted to the current missions to Mars. Although this section is not yet complete, it will include information all the way from the Viking missions to the 2003-04 Twins. You can even read our exclusive interview with Steve Squyers, chairman of NASA's Space Science Advisory Committee. Red Colony.com is now not just a great site for future colonization missions to the red planet, but for present missions as well.

- posted by Alex @ 20:33 EST

(permanent link)

Thursday, September 21, 2000


Martian Atmosphere Overview

CO2
CO2
Credit: Unknown
The atmosphere of Mars is not the same as the atmosphere of our own planet. Whereas Earth has a sizable amount of nitrogen and oxygen, with small amounts of carbon dioxide and other gases, Mars is composed mostly of carbon dioxide, with nitrogen, argon, and other trace gases. This obviously presents a serious problem for Martian colonization. Humans cannot survive in such an atmospheric composition.

- posted by Brian @ 20:57 EST

(permanent link)

Saturday, September 23, 2000


Mars News Issue 1.2

The second issue of the official RC biweekly newsletter, Mars News was released today. Here's a snippet:

What can we look forward to in the future? Well, next month you can expect the Current Missions section to be completed, the Red Colony.com CD, and a variety of new features and updates to existing pages. We expect a huge hit surge in the near future, and want to have all RC articles finished. And there are rumors abroad of a long-awaited images section soon to come.

You can read the entire newsletter here, or you can subscribe to future issues.


- posted by Alex @ 15:22 EST

(permanent link)


Plate Tectonics

A mountain range.
A mountain range.
Credit: Unknown
One distinguishing feature of Mars is that it has no measurable magnetic field. Earth's own magnetic field is due to its rather swift rotation swirling our liquid outer core and creating a dynamo. Since Mars rotates at a rate close to ours, the absence of a Martian magnetic field would seem to indicate that Mars is solid throughout.

- posted by Alex @ 18:26 EST

(permanent link)

Sunday, September 24, 2000


Critical Mass Award

We recieved this email today after being awarded the Critical Mass Award for site excellence! You can find the full email in the Email Archive.

Congratulations!!......Your site definitely qualifies for the "Critical Mass Award". A very nice site, excellent design, clever original graphics, great photos, and your content is informative, entertaining, presented well and easy to access. A worthy enterprise and a positive contribution to the Web. Thanks for helping make the Web a more interesting, educational and attractive place to visit. I really enjoyed my visit to your site and will return again when time permits :)

We are pleased to announce the opening of the Awards Section where you can find this award and others.


- posted by Alex @ 9:30 EST

(permanent link)


Image Gallery

The long awaited Image Gallery is here, jam-packed with every image ever featured on Red Colony.com. The gallery is in the convenient Fact Sheets format, and is organized into printable categories for your use.

- posted by Alex @ 13:16 EST

(permanent link)

Monday, September 25, 2000


Pic of the Day

Red Colony.com is proud to introduce the "Pic of the Day" section. This incredible feature can be found directly to the right of the page, and will be updated daily. Today's picture is a shot of NASA's X-33, a possible replacement for the space shuttle. To date, the project has cost the US government over 1 billion dollars and hasn't even made it off the ground.

- posted by Alex @ 19:06 EST

(permanent link)

Tuesday, September 26, 2000


Add Red Colony.com to Your Own Site

An incredible new feature was introduced today. You can now add the Red Colony.com Pic of the Day to your own site. With a few clicks of the mouse, you can have award winning space images on your own website. And no HTML is required! You can chose from one of three designs with more on the way. All it takes is a line of code.

- posted by Alex @ 16:58 EST

(permanent link)

Wednesday, September 27, 2000


Internet.com's Top 100 Science Sites

Today marks an important day in RC history. Red Colony.com was rated one of the web's "Top 100 Science and Technology" sites by internet.com. You can view the award in our ever-growing Awards Section. Our listing has progressed from nearly 1000th to 98th, and is continuing to move toward the top.

- posted by Alex @ 16:26 EST

(permanent link)

Thursday, September 28, 2000


NASA Advanced Life Support

I had the pleasure of meeting NASA scientist, John Baro in person last night at an Exo Quest demonstration. He recently worked on a project to develop advanced life-support systems (ALS) for future Mars missions. Today he wrote us an email about his advancements in ALS research. This exciting news can be found in the email archive. Here's a snippet:

...The last project I worked on was about NASA's advanced life support (ALS) research. Although there are many potential uses for these new ALS systems, the main thing on most of the researcher's minds is Mars. Living on Mars is one thing, but getting there is a whole other problem. ...The current feeling among the ALS people I worked with was that they would have the life support ready for a three-year manned mission to Mars within 10 years.


- posted by Alex @ 15:57 EST

(permanent link)

Friday, September 29, 2000


Martian Air Pressure

On Mars' surface, the air pressure is only about 0.7% of that of the Earth's surface. The atmospheric data taken by Pathfinder/Sojourner discovered that there were random variations in air pressure, causing the Mars equivalent of dust devils. This is explained by the theory that cold air is heated in the morning, and rises in whirlwind like patterns, very different than those of Earth.

- posted by Alex @ 15:34 EST

(permanent link)

Saturday, September 30, 2000


Mars Pathfinder Section

The metallic voice counts down....5....4....3....2....1. The ground begins to shake. And with a surge of raw power, the blue and white Delta II takes off into the sky, carrying with it the hope of mankind in their efforts to learn about the red planet. This was much the scene on December 4th, 1996, the date that the Mars Pathfinder's journey towards the barren surface of Mars began.

- posted by Alex @ 16:14 EST

(permanent link)


Global Surveyor Section

To better understand the workings of the Earth and of Mars, NASA and the JPL returned to Mars with the Global Surveyor. Launched in November of 1996, it first had a journey to Mars that lasted nearly a year until September 1997. Once it was only 400km above the surface of Mars the surveyor began mapping Mars. It began to map the surface on April 1st, 1999, and has made nearly 7000 orbits around Mars as of September 27, 2000.

- posted by Alex @ 17:16 EST

(permanent link)

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