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Sunday, October 1, 2000


Red Colony.com Bookstore

As we begin the month of October, Red Colony.com introduces an incredible new feature. The RC Bookstore has been completed, filled with books on colonizing the red planet. You may browse our collection and buy with confidence directly from Amazon.com. We receive an amount of money per sale, so go ahead an take a look. More books will be added in the near future and each book has been read and carefully reviewed.

- posted by Alex @ 20:17 EST

(permanent link)

Monday, October 2, 2000


Newly Designed RC Bookstore

Amazon.com
Amazon.com
Credit: Amazon.com
The RC Bookstore just got better. We've added features that make it more user-friendly and easy to use. Browsers can look forward to a brand new selection of books later this week, including new categories on colonizing Antarctica, Luna, and even other planets!

- posted by Alex @ 20:19 EST

(permanent link)

Tuesday, October 3, 2000


Server Down

Today our server has been down and inactive. We apologize greatly for this inconvenience and for any trouble this may have caused you. Please feel free to contact us here. The server should now be up and running and will remain active.

Thanks,
Alex Moore


- posted by Alex @ 17:06 EST

(permanent link)

Wednesday, October 4, 2000


What You Didn't See in the Presidential Debate

You might have watched last night as Governor George W. Bush and Vice President Al Gore debated over important national issues, but what you didn't see is that both candidates have long-term plans for increased NASA budgets as well as increases to research programs for space technology. Former House Science committee chairman, Bob Walker predicted that Bush alone would embrace renewed emphasis on expanding human spaceflight to both Mars and the moon. "The Bush administration would make space a priority, and that has not been done in the Clinton-Gore years," Walker said. "Space goals have become part of [Bush's] political agenda. NASA's budget has been cut and its workers have been punished for efficiency," he announced.

- posted by Alex @ 16:41 EST

(permanent link)

Friday, October 6, 2000


Celebrating First World Space Week

The UN General Assembly has declared that World Space Week will be celebrated between October 4-10 every year, beginning with this year 2000. Its primary goal will be to increase "awareness among decision makers and civil society of the benefits of the peaceful uses of space sciences and technology for sustainable development." Twenty-seven countries will participate in Space Week. The theme this year is 'The Space Millennium Begins'.

- posted by Alex @ 15:41 EST

(permanent link)

Saturday, October 7, 2000


Mars News Issue 1.3

The third issue of the official RC biweekly newsletter Mars News was released today. Here's a snippet:

What can we look forward to in the future? Well, next month you can expect the Current Missions section to be completed, the Red Colony.com CD, and a variety of new features and updates to existing pages. We expect a huge hit surge in the near future, and want to have all RC articles finished. And there are rumors abroad of a long-awaited images section soon to come.

You can read the entire newsletter here, or you can subscribe to future issues.


- posted by Alex @ 13:19 EST

(permanent link)

Sunday, October 8, 2000


Profiles Section

We have added a Profiles section, accesible through the links at right. You can read all about the people who bring you Red Colony.com, as well as some of their future plans for the site. You can also access the section from the Contact Page.

- posted by Alex @ 21:22 EST

(permanent link)

Monday, October 9, 2000


Martian Temperature

Glacier.
Glacier.
Credit: Unknown
Columbus Day - One of the major factors in the colonization of Mars is raising the temperature. It is essential to any kind of operation we may decide to undergo. Plant and animal life, atmosphere, and especially human habitation are all dependent on surface temperature. Right now, as I write this, the average Martian temperature is 210 degrees Kelvin. The Martian atmosphere has a small greenhouse effect that raises the temperature by 5 degrees K, much less than we see on Earth or Venus.

- posted by Alex @ 17:03 EST

(permanent link)

Wednesday, October 11, 2000


T-Shirts and Sweatshirts

RC Store.
RC Store.
Credit: Unknown
We are proud to introduce the new RC T-Shirt Store where you can buy the official ash-gray Red Colony.com T-Shirt and sweatshirt. Each item features the RC logo on the back and the terraformed planet of Mars on the front.

- posted by Alex @ 6:54 EST

(permanent link)

Thursday, October 12, 2000


No More Merchandise

Due to circumstances beyond our control, we are no longer selling the Red Colony.com T-shirt or sweatshirt. We appologize for this change in plans, but certain parties were offended by the merchandise that we began selling as of yesterday morning. If you ordered a t-shirt or sweatshirt, you will still receive it, but no more orders are being taken. The bookstore will remain in operation.

- posted by Alex @ 17:43 EST

(permanent link)

Saturday, October 14, 2000


Meteorite May Hold Origin to Life

Martian Meteorite
Martian Meteorite
Credit: Unknown
(CNN) - A bus-sized meteorite that blazed to Earth in a spectacular fireball in January could have delivered the most pristine primordial matter ever recovered from space and carry important new clues about the origin of life. The meteorite, estimated to weigh 220 tons when it smashed into the atmosphere, shattered and sprayed bits of space rock over a frozen lake in Canada's Yukon Territory.

(More info: CNN.com)


- posted by Alex @ 10:19 EST

(permanent link)

Sunday, October 15, 2000


Site of the Week

Yesterday we were awarded the Space Careers Site of the Week award. Here's what they said:

Yet another Mars site but this one is well worth the visit. Red Colony.com is created and maintained exclusively by high school students based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the USA. Not only is this site extremely well put together, but it also contains a wealth of information on the red planet such as bio-engineering, climatology and geology. A must see.


- posted by Alex @ 12:59 EST

(permanent link)


Advertise with Us

Would you like to advertise with Red Colony.com? The banner space above (as well as that on every page on RC) could be yours! The site reaches an international audience and is growing daily. If interested, read our Advertising Info. Take part in this exciting opportunity and join today!

- posted by Alex @ 19:52 EST

(permanent link)

Tuesday, October 17, 2000


Mars Terraforming Conference

A renowned cadre of researchers from diverse scientific disciplines will present the latest findings in terraforming Mars at a 2-day conference at NASA's Ames Research Center. The conference, "The Physics and Biology of Making Mars Habitable," will focus on restoring Mars' environment so it can support life, including possibly human life.

A Mars terraforming press briefing will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 11 between 12:30 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. in Bldg. 245, Room 215. Conference organizer and Mars researcher Dr. Chris McKay will be available to answer questions. Margarita Marinova, Julian Hiscox and Penny Boston also will be available at the briefing.

Special thanks to John Baro for sending us this information.

(More info: NASA.gov)


- posted by Alex @ 17:19 EST

(permanent link)

Thursday, October 19, 2000


Quarter Billion Year Old Bacteria

Tough bacteria.
Tough bacteria.
Credit: Unknown
(BBC) - Ancient bacteria trapped in a state of suspended animation for 250 million years are the world's oldest living things, claim US scientists. The microbes are ten times older than any previously discovered living organism and may reopen the debate about the origins of life on Earth. Bacteria are known to adapt to harsh conditions by forming resistant structures called spores. They can exist in a state of suspended animation for long periods. Salt deposits in the form of halite - the crystals in which the long-lived bacteria were found - have been discovered in Martian meteorites. "When we go to explore Mars, salt crystals would be a spot to look at," Dr Vreeland added.

(More info: BBC.co.uk)


- posted by Alex @ 15:40 EST

(permanent link)

Saturday, October 21, 2000


Meteor Shower

(NASA) - Earlier this month our Earth's orbit carried our planet into a diffuse stream of dusty debris from Halley's comet. Until now we've been in the rarefied outskirts of the debris field, but we're heading for denser parts. Tiny bits of Halley dust that burn up in our planet's atmosphere will produce a meteor shower, called the Orionids, that peaks this weekend, October 21st and 22nd. Orionid meteors won't be nearly as bright as a decaying Proton rocket shell, but the display should be nonetheless pleasing.

No matter where you live, the best time to see Orionid meteors will be during the hours from tonight through the 23rd. Rural observers should enjoy as many as 20 shooting stars per hour. During this year's broad peak, centered tonight, the light of the waning quarter Moon will make faint meteors hard to spot; pre-dawn observers tomorrow and on the 23rd may have better luck with diminishing moonlight.


- posted by Alex @ 11:29 EST

(permanent link)


Mars News Issue 1.4

The fourth issue of the official RC biweekly newsletter Mars News was released today. Here's a snippet:

We've opened the Advertising Section where you can get information about advertising on RC. This highly requested feature, we hope, will bring in a steady income so that we can continue building our site and expanding it to include more information. If you're interested in advertising on any part of RC, including this newsletter, click here.

You can read the entire newsletter here, or you can subscribe to future issues.


- posted by Alex @ 12:32 EST

(permanent link)

Sunday, October 22, 2000


Saturn's Moon of Titan is Similar to Earth

Titan.
Titan.
Credit: NASA
(MSNBC) - In one of the most distant weather reports ever received, clouds and even rain showers seem to have been spotted on Titan, Saturnís largest moon. Along with vast seas and modest mountains, a picture is emerging of a place more like Earth than anywhere else in the solar system.

Titan is a cold, dark, smog-shrouded world larger than the planet Mercury and nearly half as big as Earth. Known for decades as the only moon in the solar system with an atmosphere, Titan has many of the raw materials for life, including nitrogen, carbon and water.

(More info: MSNBC.com)


- posted by Alex @ 12:58 EST

(permanent link)

Tuesday, October 24, 2000


France to Join U.S. in Mars Exploration Mission

France has joined the United States in an important joint cooperation in its Mars exploration program. This event marks the first international effort at landing on another planet. Earlier today, French authorities in Paris signed a "statement of intent" bringing together NASA and France's space program. Together, the two governments will work on the 2003-04 Twin Rovers mission to Mars utilizing European rocket launching technology.

- posted by Alex @ 17:52 EST

(permanent link)

Wednesday, October 25, 2000


RC Haunts this Halloween Season

Red Colony.com has officially opened the Halloween season with a "booooo". Be on the look out for any ghouls or spooks that might be haunting around the Red Planet. Special thanks to For Your Eyes Only - Halloween Clipart for providing clipart and various pictures.

Featured Downloads:

  - Halloween Games
  - Halloween Music


- posted by Alex @ 17:59 EST

(permanent link)

Thursday, October 26, 2000


NASA 2005 Orbiter and 2007 Lander?

NASA has briefly announced plans for a 2005 mission to Mars in which an orbiter and a lander in 2007 will be used. The space agency will hold a press conference today for more information. Once the news is released RC will have full coverage on this exciting turn of events. Stay tuned...

- posted by Alex @ 6:55 EST

(permanent link)


NASA Redesigns the Mars Program

Rover size comparison.
Rover size comparison.
Credit: NASA
In perhaps the most exciting press conference NASA has ever held, the United States space agency, in cooperation with France and Italy, has unveiled a series of multibillion dollar orbiters, landers, and return pods to examine the Red Planet unlike ever before. The news comes after France announced Tuesday its joint cooperation with NASA and the mission to Mars.

Six missions will be launched this decade, and each mission will utilize European techniques with "aerocapture" and fuel efficient technology. Beginning with the 2001 Mars Odyssey set to launch next year, each orbiter and lander will complete multiple task assignments while in orbit. The complete radar mapping of the surface should be complete within 6 months via the Global Surveyor, after which NASA can focus on studying Mars's geological and climatological history.

The following is an up-to-date agenda of the NASA's next 15 years. Although little is known about the missions below, we will bring you the latest news as it is released.

    2001 Mars Odyssey (orbiter)
    2003 Twin Rovers (landers)
    2005 Reconnaissance Orbiter (orbiter)
    2007 Smart Lander (mobile science laboratory)
    2007 "Scout" proposed by scientific community
    2009 Radar Mapping Orbiter (orbiter)
    2011 Lander Sample Return (lander)
    2011 "Scout" proposed by scientific community
    2014 Lander Sample Return (lander)
    2015 "Scout" proposed by scientific community
    2016 Lander Sample Return (lander)


Red Colony.com will be a key deciding factor in what missions will be sent to Mars and when. One of the coolest things about NASA's plans for the future is something called a "Scout". These smaller missions would be chosen by the scientific community and would take the form of long-range survey balloons, low-cost landers, or even airplanes that could fly "a thousand miles down the canyons of Mars," said Scott Hubbard, Mars program director at NASA Headquarters.

What we have ahead of us is something truly incredible. NASA has realized that going to Mars is a priority of the human race and one that will be and must be accomplished. What knowledge we gain on the Red Planet will become the basis for a manned mission that NASA has obviously made clear will take place within 30 years. The future of Mars begins today.


- posted by Alex @ 16:03 EST

(permanent link)

Friday, October 27, 2000


NASA's Updated Announcement on Mars Missions

Return sample mission.
Return sample mission.
Credit: NASA
After yesterday's incredible news we all had many questions. How much will these missions cost? or How does NASA plan to gain the scientific community's opinion on what Scouts to send? Although many questions remain unanswered, we've compiled an up-to-date list of facts that NASA has released within the last 18 hours.

The 2005 Reconnaissance Orbiter will measure thousands of Martian landscapes at 8 to 12 inch (20 to 30 centimeter) resolution. That resolution is about 10 times better than Global Surveyor's, good enough to observe rocks the size of basketballs.

In 2007, NASA will launch a long-range, long-duration mobile science laboratory, or MSL, that would take detailed measurements of the surface unlike ever before. A drill may accompany the cargo, capable of drilling hundreds of feet into the Martian regolith. The MSL would actually be a rover similar to the 2003 Twin Athena rovers, but much larger. This entire laboratory would land on the surface by way of a "smart lander" with the ability to fine-tune its descent to avoid obstacles. This sci-fi-like landing system (shown below) has an uncanny resemblance to the Apolo descent lander used to land on the moon.

"We have developed a campaign to explore Mars unparalleled in the history of space exploration. It will change and adapt over time in response to what we find with each mission. It's meant to be a robust, flexible, long-term program that will give us the highest chances for success," said Scott Hubbard, Mars program director at NASA Headquarters.

We are up to our ears in email from our enthusiastic readers. As soon as NASA releases new information we'll post it here. Stay tuned for Future Missions sections with known information on each mission announced.


- posted by Alex @ 15:39 EST

(permanent link)

Sunday, October 29, 2000


2001 Mars Odyssey

2001 Mars Odyssey
2001 Mars Odyssey
Credit: NASA
The 2001 Mars Odyssey mission is set for launch in April of next year. Up until just recently little was known about the satellite. Read our exclusive article on the mission written by Alex Moore.

- posted by Alex @ 8:01 EST

(permanent link)


Daylight Savings Time Opens Mars Day 2000

RC is proud to announce the opening of Mars Day 2000. As people across the Earth wake up to an extra hour of daylight, few realize that this is a constant occurance on the Red Planet. Mars has a 25 hour day, similar to Earth's 24, but not quite the same until the end of Daylight Savings Time. It is on this day that Mars buffs around Earth get a glimpse of living on the Red Planet's relaxing time schedule.

- posted by Alex @ 8:07 EST

(permanent link)


Advanced Life Support

John Baro of NASA wrote us with the latest information on Advanced Life Support and his progress in designing it for future Mars missions. You can read the exclusive article here. I had the pleasure of meeting John Baro in person during a NASA Exo Quest demonstration.

- posted by Alex @ 20:19 EST

(permanent link)

Tuesday, October 31, 2000


Happy Halloween!

For some reason I decided to dress as a Secret Service Agent.

Ironically, I ran into Shane Buydasz tonight, author of the Band Wars comic featued on Bozone III (a partner site of RC). He was with someone dressed as a character from the comic that he wrote. His hilarious strip can be found here.

Trick or treat...


- posted by Alex @ 20:27 EST

(permanent link)

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