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Thursday, October 17, 2002


Red Colony.com Store Open!

Official RC T-Shirt.
Official RC T-Shirt.
Credit: Cafepress
The new Red Colony.com Store is open! If you've ever wanted to wear a t-shirt with the definition of terraforming on the front, your time has come. We also currently sell the ever-popular "Jimmy Bear" and the attractive "Wall Clock." And what's even better, until October 21 all t-shirts are 3 dollars off. Proceeds benefit the website.

- posted by Alex @ 17:40 EST

(permanent link)

Wednesday, October 23, 2002


100 Registered Members

As of today, Red Colony.com boasts an impressive 100 members in our interactive Mars forum! Join in the discussion! There are five boards to choose from on topics from Nukes in space to current events. Fight about colonization theories or politics or just chat about your favorite Mars book.

- posted by Alex @ 16:31 EST

(permanent link)

Saturday, October 26, 2002


Fan Art

Combined Earth and Mars.
Combined Earth and Mars.
Credit: Brandon Berryhill
Xbwalker, from the forum, sent us a picture of a combined Mars and Earth, similar to the Red Colony.com yin yang logo submitted way back in November of 2000 by Matt Holmes. The image itself is like a timeline of terraforming, showing the transformation of the red planet into a wet, blue planet of life.

- posted by Alex @ 15:47 EST

(permanent link)

Sunday, October 27, 2002


New Method Can Detect Small Planets

Epsilon Eridani.
Epsilon Eridani.
Credit: NASA
Can you tell the dot in this picture is a planet 1/10th the size of Jupiter in a distant star system? Apparently someone can. A group of astronomers have developed a new technique to find Earth-sized planets around other stars. Previously, astronomers could only find stars two ways: by watching for systematical dimming of stars as a planet passed over them, or by tracking a slight gravitational pull on a star by a large planet. Both methods were limited in the size and position of planets that could be detected.

(CNN) - "Not all stars have large concentrations of dust, but those that do, like Epsilon Eridani, can display certain telltale patterns in their dust fields. These patterns can betray the existence of a planet," the Rochester, New York team said in a statement. Debra Fischer of the University of California, Berkeley welcomed the technique but cautioned that stars with dust disks like Epsilon Eridani are rare. Another Berkeley astronomer, Steve Vogt, seemed less enthusiastic. "Sounds like a long shot to me," he said. "It's quite a stretch to go from a theoretical model, which makes blobs in a map on a disk, to announcing the detection of a planet. There are no doubt many ways to make blobs in a disk, without having planets there."

(More info: CNN.com)


- posted by Alex @ 8:49 EST

(permanent link)

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